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Background & Measures

Participants in the MixLife Journeys pilot program completed a 6-week creative journey of MixLife weekly online classes, with eight participants completing a brief survey before and after the program. This report evaluates the impact of the MixLife Journeys pilot program on scientifically validated measures of well-being, stress, and depressive symptoms.

Well-being was measured using a modified version of the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form which assesses overall well-being in the past month, with 10 questions evaluating emotional well-being, social well-being, and psychological well- being. Six of the most relevant individual items are also included in the results.

General stress was measured using the 4-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4), which measures global perceived stress over the past month.

Depressive symptoms were measured using a modified version of the Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Module (PHQ-9), which measures symptoms of major depression over the past 2 weeks. The suicidality question was omitted.

Analysis

For each of the three outcome measures, summary scores for each participant were created by summing numerical responses for each item. Change scores were calculated for each of the summary scores, as well as six of the individual well-being items from the MHC-SF. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess statistical significance of group-level changes from pre- to post-journey.

In April 2020, we asked our early customers to participate in a research pilot conducted in partnership with Dr. Kimberly Lockwood, Executive Director of the Stress Measurement Network at UCSF. 

Due to the pandemic, these courses were conducted fully online.

MixLife Journeys Pilot Survey Report

Results

Data and Outcomes

Well-being

  • 86% of participants reported increased overall well-being. Across the group, overall well-being increased by 33%. This change was statistically significant
     

  • 75% of participants reported increased feelings of belonging to a community. Across the group, these feelings of belongingness increased by 69%. This change was statistically significant
     

  • 86% of participants reported increases in experiences that challenged them to grow and become a better person. Across the group, these feelings of personal growth increased by 48%. This change was statistically significant.
     

  • 50% of participants reported increased happiness. Across the group, happiness increased by 8%. This change was not statistically significant.
     

  • 50% of participants reported increases in life satisfaction. Across the group, life satisfaction increased by 33%. This change was not statistically significant
     

  • 50% of participants reported an increase in warm and trusting relationships. Across the group, warm and trusting relationships increased by 30%. This change was statistically significant.
     

  • 75% of participants reported an increase in confidence in expressing themselves. Across the group, confidence in self-expression increased by 35%. This change was statistically significant.

General Perceived Stress

  • 75% of participants reported reduced general perceived stress. Across the group, perceived stress decreased by 20%. This change was statistically significant

Depressive Symptoms

  • 25% of participants reported reduced depressive symptoms. Across the group, depressive symptoms decreased by 5%. This change was not statistically significant.

​Report prepared by Kimberly G. Lockwood, PhD

Executive Director of the Stress Measurement Network

University of California, San Francisco

Pilot results table 1